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Paul J. Siegenthaler

Picture of Paul Siegenthaler

Paul J. Siegenthaler has helped numerous merging or acquired companies to integrate successfully, and has driven major business transformation programmes across Western Europe, North America and worldwide, ensuring they deliver the business case shareholders had been promised.

50% to 80% of mergers and acquisitions fail

Business integration is an art : the combination of talent and technique.  It takes strong leadership and a solid approach to change management.

What structure, resources, behaviour and interaction are key in shaping people’s minds, building acceptance of change, energizing teams, creating a sense of common purpose, blending two organisations into one and actually delivering the merger’s business case ?

Perfect M&As – The Art of Business Integration

“This book is a first class reference source for delivering the business case of any merger or acquisition.  Paul Siegenthaler’s experience as a practising manager in the field of international M&A is unrivalled. His insights and advice are invaluable.  It thoroughly recommend this book to anyone thinking about M&A as a route to growing business or improving public service efficiencies”

Prof. Christopher Bones
Dean, Henley Business School
University of Reading

Shareholders asked to approve a merger or acquisition assume it will be a success, when in fact they should assume that the outcome will be a failure unless experienced resource in brought in to provide advice, structure, direction and support.   Read more …

M&A can be an accelerator of growth, but it can also lead to the demise of a business if badly executed. Therefore getting things right the first time is crucially important.   Read more …

“Integrating companies is like pulling out teeth: you can do it quick and painful, or slow and painful; we’ll do it quick and painful”.   Read more …

The first 100 days lay the basis for trust or concern, for staff as well as for shareholders.  However I have observed that the initial focus on the first 100 days can be detrimental to the quality of the planning and knowledge transfer that need to take place subsequently.   Read more …

Whilst the failure rate of M&A has remained stubbornly high for a number of decades, companies that pursue a systematic strategy of external growth and become “serial acquirers” repeatedly succeed in integrating the businesses they acquire.   Read more …

The simple answer is no, quite to the contrary!  Very large companies and serial acquirers have their own in-house teams in charge of integration, with repeated successful experience of absorbing new businesses; most have developed their own approach with a proven track record.   Read more …